Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux growth 'to outstrip Windows by a factor of 3'

Filed under
Linux

Linux adoptions are to grow in the next three to five years at nearly triple the rate of Windows, according to Oracle.

In an interview at the LinuxWorld conference in Sydney, the database company suggested Linux deployments had grown beyond an adoption phase, and were now becoming ubiquitous in small and large businesses alike.

Monica Kumar, director of Oracle's Linux programme office, pointed to the open source operating system becoming mainstream as "businesses are looking to Linux as a way to save money," and quotes a projected annual growth rate of 11.7 percent over the next five years. The software heavyweight claims analysts project Windows' growth over the same period as being 3.6 percent per year.

"We don't come across many big companies these days that don't have a Linux strategy, which is in contrast to the market three years ago," says Kumar.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Tor Browser 5.5.1 Brings a Functional Private Anonymous Browser to Chinese Users

The Tor Project announced today, February 5, 2016, the immediate availability for download of the first point release for the Tor Browser 5.5 anonymous web browser for Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms. Read more

Ubuntu Linux in the Wild: How a French University Uses Unity

Is Canonical's Unity interface for Ubuntu Linux ready for use by the masses? Arguably, no. But the administration of the Ecole normale supérieure (ENS) in Paris apparently likes Unity well enough to deploy it throughout the university's library. The ENS is one of France's "grandes écoles," or elite universities. It also happens to have one of the only open-stack academic libraries in Paris, which is what brought me there this week. I was surprised upon entering to find that the workstations throughout the library now run Ubuntu (which was not the case when I was last there, circa early 2012). Here's proof: Read more

The trials of certifying open source software

Open source won and, over the past five years or so, we have been seeing the acceleration of a new wave of open source projects that got their starts in corporations. This comes with a set of new challenges, as new corporate participants struggle with some of the realities. Folks generally understand that foundations provide neutrality in some form, but don't necessarily know how to drive the competitive discussions from the room. One of the more disturbing symptoms of this confusion is the discussions beginning around "certification" and what it means to be certified to a particular project. What is Certified Good SoftwareTM? [1] Read more

Create Your Own Free Software Project

Free software is tremendously democratic. Anyone with a computer and an internet connection can get involved – there are no barriers of wealth or social status. Being educated in computer science helps, but there are plenty of people working on free software at Red Hat, Canonical and Intel who’ve never been to university, and who acquired their positions simply by writing great code. So anyone can contribute to free software, and anyone can start a new project as well. But how do you turn that great idea in your head into a real-life success? The likes of SourceForge and GitHub are littered with now-abandoned projects with barely 50 lines of code, which initially started as grand ideas to create the next killer music player, email client or game. Yes, free software is awesome, but 95% of projects never get off the ground or are abandoned after a few weeks. Read more