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5 Dilemmas of Linux Evangelists

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Linux

Stereotyping on the Internet is almost unavoidable due to the opacity of the medium and there are now hundreds of types of "fanbois" online since the dawn of the Internet. For tech enthusiasts with plenty of time on their hands, it's easy to troll for the occasional MacOSX, Microsoft, Android, iOS, and Apple fanboi (and yes, Apple has several categories on its own). I'm an unabashed Linux user and Linux evangelist despite being platform agnostic (the industry where I work in requires a certain level of MacOSX and Windows proficiency). Although Linux evangelists make up a small percentage (even smaller than the alleged percentage of Linux desktop users) of computer users out there, there are still hazards to attempting to promote Linux. The difficulties aren't always associated with the freakishly crazy Mac worshipers who would skewer you at any negative comment about their beloved Apple devices:

#1 Too many Linux distributions, not enough hardware

There are so many Linux distributions released regularly that merit attention and praise. However, even if I do run VMWare, VirtualBox, and Xen to test out select Linux distributions regularly (I'm currently testing Fedora 18 Cinnamon), my limited hardware really prevents me from running full installations on different hardware. As a non-gamer, I'm also particularly interested in trying out various ATI and Nvidia video cards to check performance and support. It also takes a considerable amount of time to fully understand how good or bad a Linux release is - reviewers who pan/praise a release after a scant hour on VirtualBox are questionable.

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