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Closed minds of "Open Source" eject iTWire from Linux conference

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Linux
OSS

In the more than 30 years that I have been involved with the tech industry I have seen a lot of strange things but none stranger than the events of today at the Linux Conference Australia. iTWire senior Linux writer Sam Varghese has been ejected from the conference. Why? Well, you may ask and then wonder what the Linux community in Australia has come to.

According to Linux.conf.au media and diversity officer, Lana Brindley, Mr Varghese was asked to leave the conference because he had breached the conference code of conduct. http://linux.conf.au/register/code_of_conduct.

What heinous offence did Mr Varghese commit to elicit an indignant phone call from Ms Brindley to iTWire CEO Andrew Matler at 11pm on Monday night at the conclusion of the Australia Day long weekend?

rest here




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