Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

VLC Multimedia Player Shows Changing Open Source License Is Hard, But Possible

Filed under
Software
OSS

Licenses lie at the heart of open source -- and many other kinds of "open" too. That's because they are used to define the rights of users, and to ensure those rights are passed on -- that the intellectual commons is not enclosed. Their central importance explains in part the flamewars that erupt periodically over which license is "best" -- many people have very strong feelings on the subject.

Those heated discussions are one reason why it's rare for an open source project to change its license -- usually it's just easier to stick with what you've got rather than provoke another argument over which new license should be adopted. But there's another major impediment to changing the licensing: the need to get absolutely everyone who has contributed code to agree formally.

That's not a problem when the code has been assigned by contributors to a single entity, often a software foundation, as happens with components of Richard Stallman's GNU (GNU's Not Unix) project.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Popcorn Time Makes Watching Movies Safer with Integrated VPN

Popcorn Time, an application that lets users stream movies and TV shows directly from torrents without having to download them, has been upgraded to version 0.3.6 and is now available for download. Read more

4MRecover 11.0 Beta OS Can Help Users Recover Lost Files

4MRecover 11.0 Beta, a new distribution based on 4MLinux that is designed to be used specifically for file recovery, is now available for download and testing. Read more

Android Leftovers

Will New Google Android Live TV Outfox Apple?

Google then rolled out its $35 Chromecast dongle, a streaming device, in mid-2013. Google's new Android TV operating system is expected to make it easier for software developers to move apps from mobile devices to TVs. Read more