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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 494

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Linux

Welcome to this year's sixth issue of DistroWatch Weekly! It has been an exciting week for users of open source software with big announcements coming out of the Ubuntu and GNOME projects. In this week's edition of DistroWatch Weekly we will look at the new developments underway in the GNOME community and look at the changes coming to Unity, Ubuntu's primary desktop environment. We also bring you news of Canonical's plans to launch a phone powered by the popular Ubuntu distribution. This week we turn a spotlight on server operating systems. Jesse Smith takes FreeBSD 9.1 for a spin and reports on his experience and how it compares to running Linux distributions on home servers. Plus we take a look at which Linux distributions are preferred for hosting web servers. In the Questions and Answers section we look at the common problem of broken software following an upgrade and share tips on how to deal with this issue. As always we look at the distribution releases of the past week, look forward to new releases to come and share news, reviews and podcasts from Around the Web. We wish you a pleasant week and happy reading!

Content:

Reviews: Bringing home FreeBSD 9.1
News: Web server statistics, Ubuntu enhanced search, Anaconda, PC-BSD updates, GNOME developments
Questions and answers: Dealing with broken packages
Released last week: Chakra GNU/Linux 2013.02, Frugalware Linux 1.8, Webconverger 17.0
Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 12.04.2
New additions: ForLEx
New distributions: CoreSec Linux, GOVOnix, IprediaOS, RhinoLinux
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