Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How The Linux Foundation and Fedora are Addressing Workstation Security

Filed under
Linux

Are you a systems administrator? Quick, which system in your infrastructure is most vulnerable to hacker attacks? No, it’s not the web server -- though it’s a good guess. No, it’s not the firewall. The answer may surprise you -- it’s your workstation.

Think about it -- unless you’re working for an agency with extremely rigid security policies, you are probably able to connect to servers you administer right from your workstation. Perhaps not all the time -- perhaps you have to establish a VPN connection first in order to be on the “inside.” Once that is done, however, your workstation becomes an extremely interesting target for malicious hackers, since at that time your workstation happens to be the least protected system that sits both on the outside and on the inside of your trusted network.

Did you know that your workstation is currently running software that was written for the sole purpose of letting others execute arbitrary code?

rest here




More in Tux Machines

AN EARLY VIEW OF GTK+ 3.16

We’ve had long-standing feature requests to turn scrollbars into overlayed indicators, for touch systems. An implementation of this idea has been merged now. We show traditional scrollbars when a mouse is detected, otherwise we fade in narrow, translucent indicators. The indicators are rendered on top of the content and don’t take up extra space. When you move the pointer over the indicator, it turns into a full-width scrollbar that can be used as such. Read more

Linux Container Security

Hypervisors present a smaller attack surface than containers. This is somewhat mitigated in containers by using seccomp, selinux and restricting capabilities in order to reduce the number of kernel entry points that untrusted code can touch, but even so there is simply a greater quantity of privileged code available to untrusted apps in a container environment when compared to a hypervisor environment[1]. Read more

openSUSE, ROSA, and Red Hat

Today in Linux news, Jamie Watson is back with a look at the "coming attractions" of Makulu, openSUSE, and Fedora. Lifehacker has the winner of their "best desktop" survey and there are public builds of upcoming Unreal Tournament available. IT-Director.com published an article on "The rise of Red Hat" and Red Hat's Jackie Yeaney talks marketing with Advertising Age. Blogged reviews include Scientific Linux and ROSA R4 and Make Tech Easier discovers "the power of Konqueror." Read more