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Mageia 3 Beta 2 Review – An uncut gem

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Linux

It’s about time we stop harping on about how surprised we were when Mageia’s initial release became somewhat of an overnight sensation just under two years ago. The release of Mageia 2 last year proved it wasn’t just a one hit wonder, with improvements across the board making it truly one of the best distros available today. As development nears the end for Mageia 3, we look at the second Beta to try and get an idea of what the next instalment will bring us.

First of all, going by the features list to begin with, not much has changed in Mageia this time around. The usual round of updates are present to the packages, and the most noticeable change is the inclusion of a graphical boot menu, similar to Fedora 18′s. A fairly major change will be coming before the final release with a switch to systemd for the installer, however that’s not fully implemented yet.

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