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Fedora 18: Nice Tweaks to the OS, but It's Haunted by a GNOME

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Linux

Fedora 18, dubbed "the Spherical Cow," was finally released on Jan. 15 after seven postponements that stretched two months beyond its scheduled six-month release cycle. Despite some noteworthy improvements overall to the operating system, I found little about Fedora 18 to justify adopting it over other Linux distros or upgrading to it from an earlier version.

Two software items caused the release delays. One was Anaconda, a revamped installer, and the other was FedUp, a new Fedora upgrade utility. The two are related in that the Fedora community removed all upgrade functionality from the installer in favor of having FedUp take on those duties in Fedora 18.

Perhaps the most significant addition to this current release is support for the UEFI Secure Boot. That could be key to installing the Linux OS as a dual boot on a new computer with the restrictive Windows 8.

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