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Enough with the UEFI drama already

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Recently, at a rate of about once a day, a new article comes blaming Microsoft for being evil and using their Secure Boot thingie to monopolize the desktop and prevent Linux from taking over. On top of that, Microsoft notwithstanding, lots of people are blaming UEFI for not letting them boot various Linux distributions.

I would like to use this opportunity to dispell myths and fears and pure, simple disinformation, as most of the articles written on this topic are nothing more than FUD designed to generate controversy, traffic and revenue. So let's see what gives, and why UEFI is all right, and why there is no problem whatsoever.

UEFI at a glance

The acronym stands for Unified Extensible Firmware Interface. It is a standard that defines the interface between operating systems and platform hardware. Essentially, it replaces BIOS in this function.

rest here




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