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Debian Wheezy - feather light and rock solid

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Linux

Wheezy from it's very alpha and beta phases put so many of us Debian lovers into suspicion. Whether it'll default to XFCE or Gnome. Why it jumped into that gnome 3 mess. And if it'll stick to the proclaimed "2-years - one release" schedule. With the release of RC1 it certainly proved that it sticks to the schedule. Also proved that gnome3 is not that much of a holly mess the jerks make it out to be. Little obsolete as per Fedora and Ubuntu standards, but the latest Debian is very modern, polished, and need I say, rock solid/reliable like that old Japanese village lady. It plays nice if you don't f**k like a pervert.

Installation

After cd/dvd drive started behaving mad while still under warranty I didn't go for a replacement. Not wise to add to plastic waste. Better use USB drives - for sharing data and creating bootable media. Debian is infamous for creating USB bootable media. Unetbootin didn't work as expected. But now you don't need it anymore. Bytecopy procedure works like a charm with netinstall images. I picked up a 64bit all-nonfree-firmware loaded netinstall image and created a usb install media with dd. In my case, it was:

rest here




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