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Linux Mint 14 review

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Linux

Linux Mint 14 was released in November of last year. I haven’t done a review of a Linux Mint edition since the KDE version of Linux Mint 12, which was a year ago, so I felt one was overdue.

Installation

As usual for Linux Mint, installation was trouble free and took less than half an hour. These days, the size of the default .iso file is more than a CD can hold, so I strongly recommend that if your computer is able to boot from a USB drive, you should use one and “burn” the data for Linux Mint 14 onto it. A 2 GB or larger stick will work fine, and I find UNetbootin to work very well if you’re using Windows to download and install from.

rest here




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