Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Mint 14 review

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 14 was released in November of last year. I haven’t done a review of a Linux Mint edition since the KDE version of Linux Mint 12, which was a year ago, so I felt one was overdue.

Installation

As usual for Linux Mint, installation was trouble free and took less than half an hour. These days, the size of the default .iso file is more than a CD can hold, so I strongly recommend that if your computer is able to boot from a USB drive, you should use one and “burn” the data for Linux Mint 14 onto it. A 2 GB or larger stick will work fine, and I find UNetbootin to work very well if you’re using Windows to download and install from.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Why and how I became a software engineer

Throughout my experiences, the fascinating weeks I'd spent writing out DOS commands remained a prominent influence, bleeding into little side projects and occupying valuable study time. As soon as Geocities became available to all Yahoo! Users, I created a website where I published blurry pictures that I'd taken on a tiny digital camera. I created websites for free, helped friends and family fix issues they had with their computers, and created a library database for a church. This meant that I was always researching and trying to find more information about how things could be made better. The Internet gods blessed me and open source fell into my lap. Suddenly, 30-day trials and restrictive licenses became a ghost of computing past. I could continue to create using GIMP, Inkscape, and OpenOffice. Read more

Linux Kernel 3.18.32 LTS Released with Btrfs, EXT4, ARM, x86, and PA-RISC Fixes

Immediately after announcing today the release of Linux kernel 4.1.23 LTS, and after informing us yesterday about the availability of Linux kernel 3.12.59 LTS, kernel developer Sasha Levin now published details about Linux kernel 3.18.32 LTS. Read more

Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

The effort to create a systemd-free Debian fork has borne fruit, with a beta of “Devuan Jessie” appearing in the wild. Devuan came into being after a rebellion by a self-described “Veteran Unix Admin collective” argued that Debian had betrayed its roots and was becoming too desktop-oriented. The item to which they objected most vigorously was the inclusion of the systemd bootloader. The rebels therefore decided to fork Debian and “preserve Init freedom”. The group renamed itself and its distribution “Devuan” and got work, promising a fork that looked, felt, and quacked like Debian in all regards other than imposing systemd as the default Init option. Read more

GNOME Builder 3.20.2 Arrives with LLVM 3.8, FreeBSD and OpenBSD Support

The developers behind the GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) pushed earlier to updates of the software to the stable and devel channels, GNOME Build 3.20.2 and 3.21.1. Read more