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In Defense of GNOME Icons

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Software

Recently I saw a few people commenting along of ‘GNOME 3 icons being crap’ so I investigated what the actual core of the issue might be. When dissing the years of work that went into creating the system theme and pushing app icons upstream, most of the commenters seem to actually have a problem with the folder icon.

The GNOME folder is a result of using the actual beige color that is both the real world folder material, and the legacy of Tuomas’ GNOME 1 folder. Easy things are hard so it’s a result of endless iteration with my soul mate, Lapo Calamandrei, to get the icon look great at the small sizes, but also to have the icon snap to the render grid well for the common high res sizes (64, 96, 128, 256).

rest here




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