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Open Source in Kenya

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Does open source have a place in the enterprise outside experimenters? find out how Radio Africa group is running almost entirely on open source and how Madison insurance has blended in the open "sauce' to derive the best benefits of both worlds.

Radio Africa is a media company that invests in radio, television and print. The group operates 5 radio stations, a single TV station and a newspaper and employs just under 500 employees. The group has offices in Mombasa as well as sales and correspondence offices in Nakuru, Kisumu, Eldoret and Meru. Other operations include a printing press in Nairobi's Industrial area.

Joseph Okech, the Group ICT Manager says that IT is heavily utilised in the group's operations, from paging and refining of newspapers, IT support in the printing press to support of factory machines. Under TV business, ICT supports all broadcasting operations that require IT. The IT department has 6 employees including an intern.

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