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Ubuntu For Tablets: Hot or Not?

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Ubuntu

This year, Ubuntu has been in the news more than it's ever been. Week after week, a new announcement from Canonical inundates tech sites and blogs. And this time, it's not just the Linux-based news sites that are covering them. 2013 is all about Ubuntu going mainstream. Coming from the Linux world, the word mainstream has many connotations, but when compared to what Apple, Microsoft, and Google are doing, Ubuntu is a relatively unknown player. Going head-to-head with these giants is probably what mainstream means at this moment.

With the dawn of the new year, the fledgling Ubuntu spread its wings and ventured into the perilous land of smartphones. Yes, it's the same jungle that is ruled by two lions, Android and iOS, with the open-source one dominating the shiny one. But then, all this wasn't enough to whet the appetite of the polarized Linuxians. So, Canonical dropped another bomb. They decided to go the tablet way. Though, this too drew criticism from some and praise from many, Ubuntu fans are eagerly waiting to get their hands on this one. Whether or not it's worth the wait is a different issue altogether; however, as you twiddle your thumbs with impatience, we'll run you through some of the positives and negatives of the tablet OS.

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