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OpenSUSE 12.3 vs. Ubuntu 13.04

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SUSE
Ubuntu

I'm among the first to admit that when I find a Linux distribution that I like, it takes a lot for me to be impressed with any of the alternatives. I've looked into countless distros, such as Arch, Fedora and Linux Mint, among others. Yet at the end of the day, I kept finding myself coming back to Ubuntu. And in many ways, I find this comical since I was one of the early naysayers about their use of Unity and other controversial decisions. But something happened over time – I found myself growing comfortable with the way Ubuntu does things. With my busy schedule, a distro that "just works" appeals to me.

Then something unexpected happened. I decided to take a leap of faith and gave OpenSUSE 12.3 a spin. Considering my disappointment with various package breakages in 12.2, I must admit I went into my OpenSUSE testing wearing a skeptical hat.

Flash forward to now. I'm utterly stunned at how smooth this release of OpenSUSE actually is. To put it bluntly – if I had to switch, I would switch to OpenSUSE 12.3 without a second thought.

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