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Open source still has a few gaps to fill to go mainstream

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Linux
OSS

I’ve been pondering the why of the issue regarding mainstream Linux adoption. Recently an article was spread around (and then copied and pasted onto every mainstream site that pushes Linux) that Big Business has embraced Big Linux. And it’s true. The enterprise LOVES it some Linux — and with good reason. But once you go below the oceanic waters of enterprise computing, and into the SMBs, you start seeing Linux being used less and less. Why? I strongly believe there are two reasons:

* It’s not what they are given
* There are still a few gaps to fill

I’m going to be honest with you — if a small to mid-sized business said, “We’re switching to Linux,” it would happen and probably happen with little to no issue. Problem is, not many businesses are saying that. So the end users aren’t being given Linux to use. That is, in my opinion, a reason driven by a bigger issue — gaps in the usability space.

These gaps aren’t glaring, but they are enough to affect mainstream adoption. And I firmly believe that, should the distributions and developers (and anyone else involved with open source) take a long, hard look at the list I’m about to offer, they could easily fill those gaps and Linux would enjoy an adoption rate previously unheard of. Let’s take a look at those gaps. You’ve certainly read about them here and there before — maybe not all in the same location. You may also have experienced one or more of these gaps yourself.

Let’s take a look.




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