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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 502

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 14th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Much of the spotlight this week fell on Ubuntu and Ubuntu derivatives as Canonical released a beta for the upcoming launch of Ubuntu 13.04. Ubuntu is frequently a source of experimental changes and controversy and the latest beta will provide insight into the direction Canonical is taking their popular distribution. This week we will hear the opinion of Matt Harley as he compares the upcoming Ubuntu release against the latest version of openSUSE and discusses which may serve its users better. Jesse Smith will be comparing two other technologies, specifically the Btrfs and ZFS advanced file systems. Read on to find out which file systems is better suited to your storage needs. We will also be taking a look at Linux Mint's Debian Edition, a popular distribution with a semi-rolling release approach to package management. How does the Debian Edition of Linux Mint compare with the project's other editions? Open source projects are constantly evolving and this week we hear from the FreeBSD Foundation as they search for new ideas on how to improve the powerful FreeBSD operating system. We also talk about a company which is switching to Linux and taking open source into the final frontier. Later in this issue we will cover the releases, podcasts and newsletters of the past week and look ahead to exciting new releases to come. We wish you all a pleasant week and happy reading!

Content:

Reviews: Exploring Linux Mint's "Debian" edition
News: Ubuntu vs openSUSE, the FreeBSD Foundation calls for project ideas, PC-BSD rolling-release update, Linux prepares for blastoff
Questions and answers: Comparing file systems - ZFS and Btrfs
Released last week: Pear Linux 7, OS4 13.4
Site news: Random distribution button, new news filtering option, questions about Pisi Linux and Ubuntu GNOME
New distributions: MakuluLinux
Reader comments

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