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Novell: it's the Linux desktop user stupid - part 1

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SUSE

While Red Hat muddles along ignoring the bulk of computer users, those longing to find a usable alternative to Windows on the desktop can breathe a sigh of relief that another vendor has finally taken the bull by the horns with its latest Linux release.

With apologies to the fine core development teams of Ubuntu (Breezy Badger) and the Red Hat sponsored Fedora Core 5, your latest distros, although relatively easy to install and quite functional, just don’t cut the mustard for a baseline user.

Suse Linux 10.0, by comparison, was a breath of fresh air. Although still not quite there yet, Suse goes a long way toward providing comparable functionality, usability and interoperability to the Windows desktop, plus of course all the mountains of applications that you don’t need to bother downloading.

One of the first things I noticed about Suse Linux 10.0 was the quality and detail of the documentation and the care with which the development team has kept the novice user in mind.

Full Article.


In related News:

Novell has announced the upcoming availability of SUSE® Linux 10.1, the newest version of Novell's award-winning community Linux® distribution. The first version of SUSE Linux created in full partnership with the open source community, SUSE Linux 10.1 features more than 1,500 software packages containing the latest open source innovations such as the new OpenOffice.org office suite, Firefox Web browser and multimedia tools, and delivers them to users in a single stabilized distribution. It also includes extensive desktop innovations for both GNOME and KDE users. As a result, SUSE Linux 10.1 provides everything a user needs to get started with Linux while showcasing the very best the open source community has to offer.

That Press Release.

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