Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 506

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 18th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Ubuntu's latest release, while not among the most innovative or adventurous ones, continues to intrigue many casual and home users (business users are probably more comfortable with one of LTS releases). Still, many are wondering whether they should risk an upgrade to a new but rather unremarkable release whose support has been cut down to just nine months.

In our feature article this week Jesse Smith takes a look at both Ubuntu and Kubuntu 13.04 and finds the latter a more pleasant experience.

In the news section, Debian "Wheezy" arrives after more than two years of intense development, Mageia delays its third stable release due to installer bugs, Slackware ponders the inevitability of systemd as a service manager, and FreeBSD expands its activities thanks to record-breaking receipts of funds in 2012.

Also in this issue, a link to an article comparing a number of special distributions for the Raspberry Pi, and a review of A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors and Shell Programming by Mark Sobell.

Finally, we are pleased to announce that the recipient of the April 2013 DistroWatch.com donation is the Internet Software Consortium's DHCP project.

Happy reading!

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Archive Still Free Software

In conclusion there is nothing which restricts people making derivatives of Ubuntu except the trademark, and removing branding is easy. (Even that is unnecessary unless you’re trading which most derivatives don’t, but it’s a sign of good faith to remove it anyway.) Which is why Mark Shuttleworth says “you are fully entitled and encouraged to redistribute .debs and .iso’s”. Lovely. Read more

Xubuntu 15.10 Beta 1 Drops Gnumeric and Abiword in Favor of LibreOffice Writer and Calc

Canonical has announced the release of the first Beta build for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) opt-in flavors, which include the well-known Xubuntu distribution built around the lightweight Xfce desktop environment. Read more

Technology, the law and you: Open-source software

But “free as in beer” isn’t really the point – huge numbers of corporate open-source users opt for paid commercial versions of open-source projects, for simplicity and support. And then there are all those various licenses that protect the openness of the software – GPL, Apache, Eclipse. But the good news is that, with very few exceptions, there aren’t many legal issues for the average company to worry about. Read more

Today in Techrights