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I ditched Windows 8 and went Ubuntu by mistake

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

This post is coming to you courtesy of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. While I could tell you I thought it would be cool to use Ubuntu Linux as my primary desktop OS for a while, I would be lying. The fact is I don't have a choice because I messed up the Windows 8 boot partition on my laptop last night while trying to install Ubuntu in a dual-boot situaion. I wasn't going to keep Ubuntu on for long. I had booted it from a USB stick previously. So why wasn't booting Ubuntu from a USB stick good enough, and how did I wind up stuck in Linux land? I'm glad you asked; it is a bit of a long story.

I just can't come to terms with the fact that my Android Touchpad is actually gone. I know from when I plug it in via USB to Windows that it is alive in there someplace. The laptop makes the beep indicating that it has connected to something. I can't help but feel that my tablet is stuck in some deep coma and if only I find the right note it will awake and perform as well as ever. I know that the debrick process using Ubuntu will sooner or later work. I had visions of writing an article around Easter about my Touchpad. Maybe I could have called it "It Has Risen," or maybe my "Android Touchpad Zombie." Anyway, in scouring for clues on what may bring it out of its coma, I came across a thread that said because Ubuntu is not really running on the hard drive but off of a USB stick, it that may not let it do its thing during the debrick process.

This seemed like an easy enough problem to solve. Right when you boot Ubuntu from the USB stick, there is an icon on the desktop to install it on the hard drive.

rest here




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