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Mint 15: Today's best Linux desktop

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Linux

As the years roll-by, every new update of Linux Mint impresses me more. Other desktop operating systems, such as Microsoft's Windows 8 may abandon the tried-and-true windows, icons, menus, and pointer (WIMP) desktop metaphor. Others, such as Ubuntu with Unity try to keep some of the WIMP interface while expanding it for tablets and smartphones, but the Ubuntu-based Mint, with Cinnamon and MATE, has stayed true to the WIMP interface. As far as I'm concerned the latest version, Linux Mint 15, Olivia, is now not merely the best Linux desktop, it's the best desktop operating system of all.

That's not to say that if you're a Windows 7 or Mac OS X Mountain Lion user you should start downloading Mint now. For desktop users Mint is better than Windows 8 and other new operating systems, such as Fedora 18 with GNOME 3.6, but it doesn't knock the socks off older WIMP-based desktops. It's just much better for experienced desktop users than the newer, user-hostile desktop interfaces as such as Windows 8's Metro.

Why? The main reason is that Cinnamon.




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