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Ubuntu 13.04 on me high-end box - 'orrible

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Ubuntu

All right, time for another Ubuntu review. I am going to test Ubuntu again, on a laptop with some proprietary drivers. This comes after Kubuntu and Xubuntu, both tested running from an external disk connected to my HP Pavilion laptop, equipped with an Nvidia graphics card and Broadcom Wireless. Not the most usual and trivial of setups, especially since it entails several proprietary drivers, which we have not seen in the basic test on the T61 laptop. Ergo, this should be most interesting.

So far, the experience with the 13.04 family was mixed. Some great things, like performance, accompanied with kernel crashes due to bad QA. Overall, somewhat frustrating, as the intermediate releases between LTS editions should be probably be labeled beta, for geeks only. Let's see what gives here.

rest here




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