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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 509

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 21st issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Mageia might be a young distribution, but its origins and developer experience have solid and deep roots. Forked from the troubled Mandriva Linux in September 2010, the project has recently produced its third stable release. How does it compare to the other big distributions on the market? Read Susan Linton's first-look review, accompanied by a short interview with Anne Nicolas, in the lead article of this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly.

In the news section, GNU announces an unofficial release of Debian GNU/Hurd 2013 built from Debian's unstable packages, Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth talks about Mir, Unity and developer relationships, Munich city representatives confirm the continued migration of the municipal computer systems to LiMux, and RebeccaBlackOS developer demonstrates the first "true" live CD that with the Wayland display protocol. Also in this issue, a continued debate over the usefulness of some Linux distributions, a Questions and Answers section explaining the meaning of "ports" as interpreted by various operating systems, and an introduction to the Puppy-based Simplicity Linux.

Happy reading!




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