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BeagleBone Black Review

Filed under
Hardware

Specifications

Price: $45/£37
Operating system: Angstrom Linux 3.8.6 (Pre-Loaded)
Processor: 1GHz Texas Instruments Sitara AM3359 Cortex-A8 SoC
Graphics: Imagination Technologies PowerVR SGX530 (Embedded)
Memory: 512MB DDR3
Storage: 2GB eMMC NAND Flash (Expandable via Micro-SD)
Network: 10/100 Ethernet
GPIO: 65 User-Accessible Pins, McASP, SPI, I2C, LCD, GPMC, MMC, AIN, CAN,
PWM, 4x Timers, 3x Serial Ports
Other: Micro-HDMI, USB 2.0, Optional JTAG Header
Dimensions: 88.4mm x 55.2mm x 19mm
Weight: 40g (excluding cables)

Review

When the Raspberry Pi launched at its headline-grabbing price of less than £30 for a fully-fledged single-board computer, the SBC market was forced to sit up and take notice. For buyers, it’s proven a bonanza: companies as diverse as VIA and Olimex have rushed to bring their own Pi-alike to market for a similar price tag, and now it’s the turn of the open-hardware BeagleBoard project.

The original BeagleBoard was a typical SBC of its time – and came with a hefty price-tag attached. Its cut-down variant, the BeagleBone, offered a design more suited to permanent installation in projects – but still sold at a cost that made it a hard sell compared to the Pi.

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