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Wayland they’d called it

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Software

Wayland is a new protocol, designed to replace the sturdy and reliable X Windows System. The idea is to create a more modern, more relevant method of transferring video frames from applications to the on-screen display, in a manner that is fast, efficient and extensible. On paper, it’s an interesting approach to an old problem, but the question is, is there a problem really?

Wayland, today

If you recall, and you must recall, my article on Qt, portability as a gateway to profit seems to be the common theme for most players diverging from the conventional computing form factor, the desktop. Apparently, the efforts needed to power a display on a large computer are not that lucrative when you have to apply them to tiny devices with a very short battery life and few CPU cycles to spare. Development costs and complexity also come to bear, the end result is, upheaval in the Linux community, as another pillar of stability is shaken, not stirred. As with any technology, people clamor for and against.

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