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How Linux Foundation Runs Its Virtual Office

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Linux
Software

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit that manages much of the day-to-day business behind the open source operating system, maintains a small office in San Francisco. Stop by, however, and you probably won't find anyone there. That's because the organization's 30-something employees work virtually. It's like the anti-Yahoo: Just about everyone, including Linux kernel creator Linus Torvalds, works from home.

"We really wanted to have that effectiveness and nimbleness of a virtual organization," said Amanda McPherson, Linux Foundation's VP of marketing and developer programs, in an interview. The results have been so strong, McPherson added, that she rarely goes in to the San Francisco office even though she lives in the Bay Area. Ditto for her boss, executive director Jim Zemlin, who lives in the city but still works remotely. "We all work remotely," McPherson said.

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