Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fanboys in Free Software

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Years ago I had a clear political opinion. I was a civil-rights activist. I appreciated freedom and anything limiting freedom was a problem to me. Freedom of speech was one of the most important rights for me. I thought that democracy has to be able to survive radical or insulting opinions. In a democracy any opinion should have a right even if it’s against democracy. I had been a member of the lawsuit against data preservation in Germany. I supported the German Pirate Party during the last election campaign because of a new censorship law. That I became a KDE developer is clearly linked to the fact that it is a free software community.

But over the last years my opinion changed. Nowadays I think that not every opinion needs to be tolerated. I find it completely acceptable to censor certain comments and encourage others to censor, too. What was able to change my opinion in such a radical way? After all I still consider civil rights as extremely important. The answer is simple: Fanboys and trolls.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Samsung docs detail Linux TRIM bug and fix

We've been covering a report from search provider Algolia pointing out a potential issue in Samsung SSDs' TRIM implementation. More recently, Samsung itself reported that the bug actually resides in the Linux kernel, and that the company had submitted a patch for the problem. Now, we have more details of the bug. Samsung has provided us with internal documents detailing the exact cause of the issue, and the subsequent solution. We're geting a bit technical here, so we'll take some liberty to simplify. When Linux's RAID implementation receives a sequence of read or write operations, it creates separate buffers in memory for each of them. Read more

Google Play Store/Chrome Web Store

GitHub rumor confirmed: It raised $250M at $2B valuation

Leftovers: OSS

  • NPR Open Sources "Lunchbox" Tools for Cloud and Social Graphics
    Whether you do some blogging, work as a journalist or just make use of popular social media and cloud computing tools, you probably regularly need to acquire and customize publishable graphics. The good people at NPR are out to make that job easier.
  • 6 top continuous integration tools
    Continuous integration (CI) is an integral part of an agile software development setup. Sprint after sprint, teams strive to "not break the build" while delivering incremental features. But when developers focus completely on adding features, code errors can sometimes creep in and render the software unusable. To stop such errors from being integrated into the software configuration management (SCM), a CI server is the gatekeeper that helps keep a tab on code quality. Even if the code is integrated to SCM, a CI server can quickly tell you what went wrong. In this post, let's take a look at six open source CI server tools that you can use in your agile setup.
  • Now SourceForge For Sale
    After a run of bad publicity and floundering to retain and attract users, parent company DHI today announced SourceForge.net and Slashdot.org are for sale. DHi said the reason was due to a refocus on their employment services. Elsewhere, CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi spoke with InfoWorld.com's Paul Krill about cloud strategies and OpenSource.com wants to know what is your favorite desktop environment. It's been a rough year for SourceForge. SourceForge began last Summer by asking users to change their passwords for now reason at all before finally admitting the database had been hacked. Then they were found to be taking over software sources that appeared to have been abandoned and adding spyware into bundled installers. Later projects began fleeing in droves and SourceForge began a campaign to soften their image by reaching out and communicating more with "the community." Today their owner announced the immediate availability of SourceForge.net and as an added bonus, if you dial before midnight tonight, you'll get Slashdot.org too. The announcement said the sale was due to "not successfully [leveraging] the Slashdot user base to further Dice's digital recruitment business." No asking price was given, but DHi paid $20 million for the sites in 2012.
  • Nóirín Plunkett: Remembering Them
    Today I learned of some of the worst kind of news, my friend and a valuable contributor to the great open source community Nóirín Plunkett passed away. They (this is their preferred pronoun per their twitter profile) was well regarded in the open source community for contributions.
  • Getting physical: A $10 device to clone RFID access keys on the go
    A $10 device capable of skimming access cards on the go is soon to be released into the open-source community. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards are a quick and convenient way for businesses to track as and when their employees are on site, and also act as a way to both restrict and permit access to particular corporate locations. While RFID technology can help secure enterprise offices in this way, the ease in which these access controls can be hacked has hit the spotlight in the form of a tiny device which costs only $10 to make.
  • OpenDaylight Beryllium Takes Shape
    Colin Dixon, Technical Steering Committee Chair (TSC) at the OpenDaylight Project and a Principal Engineer at Brocade, said that the thing he's most proud of during the Lithium release cycle was that it landed on time, without too much pain. He commented that the maturity of the overall project has grown over the last two years, making a stable release cadence possible.