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Free and Commercial Game Engines

Filed under
Gaming

The appearance of new game engines with Linux support gives rise to hope that more games will start to appear in Linux versions. The free game engines are also getting better.

Commercially successful games usually score high with their perfect blend of breathtaking graphics, well-animated characters, realistic lighting, spectacular sound, and convincing effects. These features all can be developed from the bottom up; nowadays, game engines come into play in this process. Game engines can cater to 2D or 3D graphics, and some come complete with the necessary development modules.

The graphics engine takes care of textures, lighting effects, object animation, and so on. The physics engine ensures that the game objects conform to physical behavioral rules (rigid-body physics) – which also applies to liquids.

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