Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The People Who Support Linux: Prospective kernel developer

Filed under
Linux

Kieran Grant works in IT support for a financial services company but unabashedly aspires to be a Linux SysAdmin and, someday, a kernel developer. After using and hacking Linux for five years, the 19-year-old from Logan City in Queensland, Australia is well on his way to achieving that goal.

His love of machines and “anything mathematical” led him to first start learning assembly code using the MS-DOS debug program. He switched to Linux because it meant he could “learn how a real OS worked, straight from the source code,” and it helped him learn C programming. At the time, he had a slow Internet connection and low usage limit so his first distribution was SimpleMEPIS -- a dated version he bought on eBay.

After finishing high school he earned a TAFE diploma in IT Networking and went to work with his brother, Ryan, at Wealth & Retirement Solutions in Brisbane as an IT support consultant.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Updated Debian 8: 8.11 released

The Debian project is pleased to announce the eleventh (and final) update of its oldstable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. After this point release, Debian's Security and Release Teams will no longer be producing updates for Debian 8. Users wishing to continue to receive security support should upgrade to Debian 9, or see https://wiki.debian.org/LTS for details about the subset of architectures and packages covered by the Long Term Support project. The packages for some architectures for DSA 3746, DSA 3944, DSA 3968, DSA 4010, DSA 4014, DSA 4061, DSA 4075, DSA 4102, DSA 4155, DSA 4209 and DSA 4218 are not included in this point release for technical reasons. All other security updates released during the lifetime of "jessie" that have not previously been part of a point release are included in this update. Read more Also: Debian 8.11 Released As The End Of The Line For Jessie

Today in Techrights

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.