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What's new in Linux 3.10

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Linux

Linus Torvalds released version 3.10 just nine weeks after Linux 3.9 was released, making this development cycle about one week shorter than many previous cycles. This speed is particularly impressive considering more changes were integrated into the latest kernel version than ever before, at least if you go by the number of commits in the source code management system – the number of lines changed is about the same as for previous versions.

Graphics

The Radeon driver in the Linux kernel now offers interfaces for interacting with the Unified Video Decoder (UVD) on Radeon HD 4000 and later HD graphics cards. An open source UVD driver which uses this interface will be included in the next major revision to Mesa 3D (version 9.2 or 10.0). The kernel now supports the graphics chip on the recently released Richland processor family, otherwise known as A4, A6, A8 and A10 series APUs. Linux can also now address Radeon Hainan GPUs.

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