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Fedora vs. Ubuntu

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Linux
Ubuntu

As newer Ubuntu users become more accustomed to their desktop experience, occasionally they decide to try something different—like Fedora. With my previous article, I took a stern look at OpenSUSE vs. Ubuntu. So in this article, I'll explore the differences between Fedora and Ubuntu, along with examining areas where each distribution excels or fails.

Installation Made Simple

One area where both Ubuntu and Fedora have done a great job is in making sure that the operating system's installation is as simple as possible. With both distributions, selecting the desired partitions and continuing with the installation is as easy as clicking "next."

Where things differ, however, is when you're selecting your ISO to download. Fedora provides you with the GNOME desktop, whereas Ubuntu relies on Unity. Both share some things, but for the most part, they're very different user experiences. Personally, I found Unity to be on par with a vanilla GNOME installation, as each provide much of the same functionality.

rest here




dear, dear

Geez, seems like anyone can write these days, blogs be blessed.

"Nothing against Fedora—it's fine—but it just simply doesn't have a well-defined niche these days."

Fedora is a LOCOMOTIVE for a LOT of open source software! A good deal of testing and development (if not most) for the linux kernel, Xorg, Wayland, Gnome and apps, systemd, KVM, libvirt, lxc (and even xen), openstack, freeipa, Libreoffice and COUNTLESS other projects equally important is done on Fedora; not to mention it is THE test bed and source of the "one true" enterprise distro (RHEL). How's that for a "well-defined niche"?

Maybe the author should learn how to "rpm -i adobe-repo.rpm" instead of writing a 2 page of whining.

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