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Change OSS Licenses to Make More Money?

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OSS

In a recent article1, Monty Widenius, a primary author of MySQL, argues that typical open source licensing is a problem for entrepreneurs, and that a change is needed. He recommends something he calls “business source,” which essentially means code under a commercial license that automatically converts to an open source license after a defined period of time, such as three years. Each new version of the code triggers a new three-year license clock for that version.

Clearly, this is not in the spirit of open source: it puts restrictions on the code (even though the restrictions eventually lapse). Why does he propose this? He claims such a move would help young companies make more money from their investment of time and resources.

I disagree strongly.




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