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A Letter to Windows 8.1 from a non-technical Linux user

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Hello, Windows 8.1

I am a non-technical Linux user. But wait! Before you turn away in denial (yes, we exist), let me tell you that I once was a long time Windows user. In fact, I started my relationship with your family when I met your great-grand parent, Windows 3.11. 95 and I worked side by side, and 98 also drew me closer to your family. Then I learned how to install OSs myself and thus became a good friend of ME, to whom I painfully had to let go when XP came along.

Can I call you "Blue"?

Well, it's true that my dealings with your family became tense thanks to XP, but I forgave him for all of his uncontrollable RAM cravings and constant infections. I made myself like him as everybody else did. He was a popular guy.

Blue, your cousin Vista came one day and told me that I had to forget about XP. Vista made me dislike your family intensely. That's when I became a Linux user, you see?

No, Seven did not mend things. He has Vista blood after all.

rest here




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