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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 515

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Welcome to this year's 27th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! The challenges of maintaining on-line privacy have been in the news a lot this past month. This week Jesse Smith reviews a Whonix, a project that strives to make it easy to maintain privacy while navigating the digital world. Also in this issue we will get a first look at Linux Deepin, a user-friendly distribution which features Chinese language support.

In the spotlight this past week was the latest Fedora release. Fedora is a cutting-edge distribution and there are always exciting changes coming out of the project, be sure to check out some early impressions below. Speaking of exciting changes, with GTK+ 2 being abandoned in favour of newer technologies, what will become of desktop environments that rely on this once-popular toolkit? LXDE's developers are looking at some unexpected options and we will talk about their experiments and the future of LXDE in this week's News section. Software isn't the only thing that changes, hardware also has the ability to affect the open source landscape and, with that in mind, this week we hear from Marshall Mickusick as he discusses FreeBSD's plans for dealing with Secure Boot technology. Plus the Linux Mint project announced last week the popular minty distribution will be bundled with a new personal computer called the MintBox. Finally, good news for fans of the Raspberry Pi as five new distributions specially built for the popular mini computer have been added to the DistroWatch database.

Happy reading!

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