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Using An Old Computer? Give It New Life With LXDE

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Software

As Linux is arguably the most customizeable operating system between it, Windows, and Mac OS X; there’s plenty of room to change just about whatever you please. Proper customizing can potentially lead to massive performance improvements, giving even the oldest hardware a new leash on life. I previously reviewed Xfce quite a while back as a great choice for resource-conscious users, but apparently there’s a new kid on the block that is even more lightweight and great for the crappiest hardware imaginable.

About LXDE

LXDE, which stands for Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment, aims to provide a usable and feature-filled desktop environment with the least impact on your system resources. Therefore, this is great for users who are using very low-end or old hardware such as netbooks or computers that are more than 7 years old. Additionally, it’s also good for users who are paranoid about the resource usage of their operating system, even if they have ultra-high end machines. This just ensures that most of the resources are available to the apps you wish to use and interact with.

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