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Review: Korora 19 "Bruce" GNOME

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In the comments of my review of Korora 18 "Flo" KDE, a bunch of people asked me to review Korora 19 "Bruce" GNOME. Now that this new version is out, I'm going to review it. It hasn't been too long since my last review of Korora, so I'll skip the introduction and get right to the main stuff. I reviewed the 64-bit edition (usually I review the 32-bit versions of distributions essentially by default, but this time the 32-bit edition seemed rather delayed to the point when I first downloaded the ISO file, I was under the impression that Korora might have dropped 32-bit support) on a live USB made with MultiSystem. Follow the jump to see what it's like.

After the boot menu, I was greeted by the same sort of boot splash as last time. That led relatively quickly into the desktop, which is a standard GNOME 3/Shell desktop, so I won't dwell too much on that. The only thing of note is the wallpaper, for two reasons. The first is that it looks quite nice with its subtle brown shades and Korora branding. The second is that one time after logging in, it failed to load properly and I was left instead with the drab gray background from the GDM login screen lingering.
Additionally, I wanted to try the new GNOME 3/Classic desktop, but it seems like logging out and back in is not enough to enable that environment; a full reboot is required, which is of course impossible to do in a live session, and moreover, I thought rebooting after these kinds of software installations (except for kernel upgrades, of course) were relics of Microsoft Windows.

rest here

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