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JOE: Old-School Text Editor Teaches New Lessons

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Software

Joe's Own Editor is an endearing text editor that brings old-school charm to any Linux distro.

Do not mistake being old-school for being outdated: JOE has been in use on the Linux desktop since 1988. It is a standard item in most distro repositories and is readily available in the Synaptic Package Manager as well.

Unless you know about JOE, however, you will not be drawn to it, because it runs in a terminal window and has no fancy GUI. Almost everything you do in Joe keeps your fingers on the keyboard, and for new users, that is the user experience that may get in the way.

Its old-school appeal is readily noticeable when you first run it.

rest here




JOE Editor

Learned Wordstar on an old Z-80 based (CPM) machine so many centuries ago, so I still use JOE for a non-gui text editor. Never really learned Vi or emacs, but the key commands for JOE are still built into my fingertips.

re: JOE

I never used Joe much. I encountered it a few times on some distros. I learned and used vi for years, nothing fancy, just basic functions for quick configurations and edits. Then later vim as it became default instead of actual vi.

...until I switched to gentoo. nano was the default text editor on gentoo and I got very used to it. it's my go-to terminal editor if available to this day. sometimes I can't remember the vi key combos anymore. Tongue

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