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Who’s Winning the PC OS War? Who Cares?!

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Henry Blodget in Business Insider: “In the late 1990s, a single technology company became so unfathomably rich and powerful — and so hellbent on dominating not just its own industry but a massive and rapidly growing new one — that the U.S. government dragged the company into court and threatened to break it up over anti-trust violations.

The case was settled, and the company, Microsoft, agreed to play nicer.

But it turned out that the world had nothing to worry about. As often happens in the technology industry, what has really destroyed Microsoft’s choke hold on the global personal computing market over the past 15 years hasn’t been a legal threat but a market shift.

Just when it looked like Microsoft’s vision of the PC as the center of the tech world would lead to the creation of the world’s first trillion-dollar company, the Internet came along.

And it washed over the PC industry like a tidal wave swallowing a pond.

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