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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Leftovers

Devices: Nintendo Switch, Kontron, LineageOS 'on' Android

  • Tegra X1 Exploit Opens Up Nintendo Switch, Other Devices
    NVIDIA’s powerful Tegra X1 chip sits at the heart of the Nintendo Switch, along with the Google Pixel C and the NVIDIA SHIELD TV, and a new exploit called Fusée Gelée has opened the Switch up for developers and has far-reaching implications for the two Android-running Tegra X1 devices. Fusée Gelée was originally found by engineer Katherine Temkin and hacking group ReSwitched, the exploit runs at the boot level, and seemingly cannot be patched on current Nintendo Switch units. It allows for full modification of the Switch’s code, up to and including running a full GNU/Linux distribution, and will likely mean similar developments for the SHIELD TV and the Pixel C.
  • Linux-friendly Coffee Lake module supports up to 64GB DDR4
    Kontron’s “COMe-bCL6” COM Express Basic Type 6 module features Intel’s 8th Gen Core and Xeon CPUs with 4x SATA III, 4x USB 3.1, 8x PCIe, and options including a 1TB NVMe SSD, -40 to 85°C, and up to 64GB DDR4. Kontron has unveiled its first product based on Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors. The COMe-bCL6 joins other Coffee Lake based COM Express Basic Type 6 modules including the Congatec Conga-TS370 and Seco COMe-C08-BT6, which were announced early this month when Intel rolled out 18 Coffee Lake H-, M-, U- and T-series Intel Core and Xeon chips, as well as the more recent Data Modul EDM-COMB-CF6 and MSC Technologies MSC C6B-CFLH.
  • How to Install LineageOS on Android
    I’ve you’ve been considering giving your phone new life with a custom ROM, LineageOS is one of the most popular ones available today. Here’s everything you need to know about flashing this ROM onto your phone.

OSS Leftovers: Using Open Source to Drive Automation, Arcan and OpenBSD, RISC-V

  • Using Open Source to Drive Automation
    While the IT side of telecom organizations has a long history of using open source technology, the networking side has traditionally relied more on commercial solutions that adhere to industry standards. And for good reasons. Although industry standards development organizations have a bad rep for death by PowerPoint and interminable meetings, they have delivered robust, global standards that meet the stringent quality requirements of the communications industry and enable a degree of interoperability that avoids vendor lock-in while still promoting innovation.
  • Towards Secure System Graphics: Arcan and OpenBSD

    Let me preface this by saying that this is a (very) long and medium-rare technical article about the security considerations and minutiae of porting (most of) the Arcan ecosystem to work under OpenBSD. The main point of this article is not so much flirting with the OpenBSD crowd or adding further noise to software engineering topics, but to go through the special considerations that had to be taken, as notes to anyone else that decides to go down this overgrown and lonesome trail, or are curious about some less than obvious differences between how these things “work” on Linux vs. other parts of the world.

  • RISC-V SiFive Freedom Unleahsed 540 SoC / HiFive Unleashed Board Added To Coreboot
    Landing today within the Coreboot Git tree is support for the RISC-V based SiFive Freedom Unleashed 540 System-on-a-Chip and SiFive's Unleashed mainboard making use of this SoC built around the royalty-free and open processor ISA. The SiFive Freedom Unleashed 540 is considered to be the first RISC-V SoC capable of running Linux and with just over 400 lines of new code added to the existing RISC-V code in Coreboot, that SoC should now have its initial support in place. This SoC runs in a 4+1 multi-core configuration at speeds up to 1.5GHz with four cores being the RV64GC application cores and the fifth being the RV64IMAC management core. There is a 2MB L2 cache, support for 64-bit DDR4 with ECC, and Gigabit Ethernet backed by this SoC manufactured on a 28nm processor.

R and Mozilla Development

  • A Good Front End for R
    R is the de facto statistical package in the Open Source world. It's also quickly becoming the default data-analysis tool in many scientific disciplines. R's core design includes a central processing engine that runs your code, with a very simple interface to the outside world. This basic interface means it's been easy to build graphical interfaces that wrap the core portion of R, so lots of options exist that you can use as a GUI. In this article, I look at one of the available GUIs: RStudio. RStudio is a commercial program, with a free community version, available for Linux, Mac OSX and Windows, so your data analysis work should port easily regardless of environment. For Linux, you can install the main RStudio package from the download page. From there, you can download RPM files for Red Hat-based distributions or DEB files for Debian-based distributions, then use either rpm or dpkg to do the installation.
  • happy bmo push day!
    New Features: Comments are remembered if you cancel an edit or navigate away from the bug page, and private comments are more obviously private.