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Ubuntu forums hacked; 1.82M logins, email addresses stolen

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Ubuntu Forums suffered a massive data breach, the company behind the Linux open-source based operating system said on Saturday.

In an announcement posted on its main forum page, Canonical confirmed there had been a security breach and that the team is working to restore normal operations.

The notice said "every user's local username, password and email address" from their database was stolen. The company confirmed that though the passwords are not stored in plain text, users who share passwords across sites are encouraged to change them.

"Ubuntu One, Launchpad and other Ubuntu/Canonical services are not affected by the breach," the open-source company stated.

An estimated 1.82 million users are subscribed to the forums.

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