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Linus, Sarah and the Linux Civil Code

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Linux

Anyone who has ever spent five minutes in the Linux blogosphere is probably already well-aware of Linux creator Linus Torvalds' propensity for speaking his mind in the plainest of terms.

It was just slightly more than a year ago, after all, that he dropped an "F-bomb" on Nvidia, though that's by no means been the only example over the years.

Well, Torvalds is surely no stranger to criticism for his blunt approach, but recently an example arose to make that disapproval more clear than ever.

The critic this time around? None other than a Linux kernel developer named Sarah Sharp.

rest here




They should keep their mouths shut and take it like pros

They should keep their mouths shut and take it like pros. Can't really say more than this.
Linus is giving the world Linux and what does he ask in return? Castles, yachts, limousines? No.
At least let him speak however the fuck he wants. He's earned it.

Couldn't disagree more...

Quote:

and what does he ask in return? Castles, yachts, limousines? No.
At least let him speak however the fuck he wants. He's earned it.

Regarding Linus's wealth, at least one article at therichest.org indicates that his net worth is 150 million, and his annual salary is 10 million. That's darn near a million a month--hardly poverty by any standards.

The comment implies that not pursuing or possessing wealth condones rude and boorish behavior. I couldn't disagree more.

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