Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

On Dancing Chickens

Filed under
Software

Decades have passed, and I still have the same problem as a leisure-time hacker. Imagine I put together some little cute diversion: for the sake of this example, imagine I make an app that has a dancing chicken animation and plays a chiptune. If I want people to check it out, I still can't just send it to them and have them run it. Not on Linux + GNU + X + Gtk + GNOME + Alsa + PulseAudio. It is slightly less bad on the non-free desktop OSs like Windows because I can statically link something together, but there are still VC and DirectX redistributibles to worry about.

I could do that on FreeDOS, but, not to many people run FreeDOS.

But I can still create a portable diversion on the web. A browser downloads my HTML/CSS/JS and handles the glue between my code and the computer's capabilitites. Or there's Flash that accomplished the same thing.

After the jump, I rant a bit about why it is still hard to deliver a little desktop app. I know that I'm wrong and that my argument is poorly though out. Please tell my how and why and what I'm not seeing.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

grep-2.21 released [stable]

This is to announce grep-2.21, a stable release. There have been 94 commits by 3 people in the 25 weeks since 2.20. Read more Also: GNU Parallel 20141122 ('Rosetta') released

SUSE invests in software-defined storage

SUSE, the enterprise Linux company, is working on its own storage solution using open-source Ceph: SUSE Storage. Read more

Linux 3.18-rc6

Steady progress towards final release, although we still have a big unknown worry in a regression that Dave Jones reported and that we haven't solved yet. In the process of chasing that one down, there's been a fair amount of looking at various low-level details, and that found some dubious issues, but no smoking gun yet. But that explains some of the patches in rc6.. Read more

Open Source Code Contains Fewer Defects, But There's a Catch

Research suggests that software developed using open source code contains fewer defects than that built with proprietary code. The catch is that open source code rarely benefits from security teams specifically tasked with looking for bugs. Read more