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LinuxMint 15 delivers smooth alternative to Ubuntu

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Linux

The crafters of the LinuxMint distro are in a ticklish position. Mint is based on Ubuntu, which in turn, is based on Debian, which in turn, has the moveable feast of the Linux kernel as its underpinning. All three have changed underneath LinuxMint, but LinuxMint 15 pulls off a new cut without missing a step (save a missing KDE version).

We found LinuxMint 15 to be smoother than the previous version, a bit heftier, yet more adept. What really intrigued us is a Debian version that's a rolling version, and although it's called LinuxMint 15, it's more like LinuxMintForever. It's also not a good choice for civilians for a number of reasons. There's also a skinny version, LinuxMint Xfce.

Gone in the primary edition are a few clunky apps, and we found waning support for older hardware, although few are likely to complain. We still need to download replacement apps, because some of the ones that are included continue to do weird tricks.

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