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The state of the Linux community

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Linux

What prompted me to write this article were two things. One, the recent donation drive on Tuxmachines. Two, the announcement about the closing of The H, which you may also have known as The H: Open Source, Security and Development. What is common for both these announcement is the obvious difficulty in having a sustainable financial model when running sites dealing in Linux.

This gave me an idea for an article. At first, I wanted to debate this from the standpoint of guilt, and blame the community, because, well, it's kind of true, in a way. Then, I thought about it some more, and figured a more positive angle could work better. So let me tell you why should strive to be better people.

The greatest philanthropist alive

Bragging is my middle name, but in this case, it is warranted. I want to tell you about several community efforts that I've undertaken over the years. I don't expect false praise and excess flattery, not too much anyway, but I do expect you to understand the importance of actively contributing to the community.

rest here




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