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Gone Home Review

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Gaming

f I were to wander through your house while you were out and thumbed through your mail, your medicine cabinet, your closet or your night stand, what story would unfold? What would the notes, the books and the keepsakes scattered throughout say about you, your values, your fears and desires? Few of us would be comfortable allowing someone to do this. Perhaps we feel this way because our possessions tell stories that are often very personal. Gone Home, the first game from the Fullbright Company, sets players loose to explore an old house that a family recently moved into. More than a videogame about voyeurism, Gone Home invites players behind the curtain of a family’s life and in so doing tells one of the most intimate and compelling stories I have experienced.

Gone Home puts us in the shoes of Kaitlyn Greenbriar, a recent high school graduate who returns to her parents’ home after a year long trek through Europe to find the house empty. One of the first things I find is a note from Katie’s sister, Sam, asking Katie not to go snooping around the house trying to figure out where she went. It’s an invitation to be voyeuristic. I’m Katie, and Sam is my sister, so I do what any good sister would and completely disregard Sam’s request. I immediately leap into the role of the voyeur.

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