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Wireless Aside, Cr OS Linux Delivers the Best of Two Worlds

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The Cr OS Linux distribution is an interesting blend of the Cinnamon desktop with a special edition of the Chromium Web browser.

The approach Cr OS Linux (pronounced "Cros Linux") takes gives you a taste of Linux Mint with a chaser of a not-quick pure Google Chrome OS.

Cr OS is a fully functional Linux distro. It has its own repository and package manager to provide software updates.

I was generally pleased with Cr OS. Its lightweight design does not have many of the advanced features that tend to bog down Linux Mint, but the Cinnamon desktop definitely provides a Minty look and feel.

The only serious impediment is its high rate of incompatibility with wireless hardware. If all you need is a solid Linux OS for your desktop computer, Cr OS could be an ideal choice. If you also want to use it on laptops, however, chances are it will not connect to your wireless card.

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