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Building Linux: History in the Making

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Linux

One of the greatest impacts Linux is having on the technology industry is in the way it’s built. We often tout Linux’s success stories - from running Facebook, Amazon and Google to powering eight out of 10 financial trades to running the world’s supercomputers and mobile devices, and more. But these successes are the results of a massive collaborative development effort that is 22 years in the making and today is being studied and leveraged by everyone from software developers to business executives in industries ranging from networking to financial services to life science and more.

One of the things we do each year is partner with Linux kernel developers Jon Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman to understand the rate at which Linux is being developed, who is writing the code and what companies are sponsoring that work. The result is our annual “Who Writes Linux” report, which we’re releasing today atLinuxCon/CloudOpen. The report helps give us a glimpse into how Linux is able to rise and adapt to new technology requirements across industries more quickly than any other operating system. It’s truly history in the making.

Here are some of the highlights from this year’s paper:




Also: Who Writes Linux in 2013?
And: Google and Samsung soar into list of top 10 Linux contributors

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