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Breaking up with my distro

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Humor

So, here's the idea. Linux users are dedicated to their distribution of choice. Many new users experiment, testing the waters, with different distros before they decide on one to stick with. There are also those of us that use different distros for different purposes.

There are also those of us, although it might be rare, that have actually held down a relationship...and much like "switching distros," switching girlfriends can be hard. This kind of gave me an idea for those of you new to either linux or girlfriends. This is my guide to breaking up with your distro. It's written from the "guy breaking up with gal" point of view, but it can easily be modified for other ways.

SuSE - STOP TALKING TO ME! We were NEVER together! It was ONE NIGHT! I was drunk and I regret EVERY second of it. I can't look in the mirror any more without being ashamed! I swear, if you don't stop calling me I'll get a restraining order! If I get one more dirty voice mail I'll tell everyone you're a STD virus warehouse...hell, I'm sure you are anyways...

Full Article.

hahaha

Pretty good stuff.

Re: hahaha

Texstar wrote:

Pretty good stuff.

Yeah, it was pretty cute. I just wonder which distro he finally married. Big Grin

Re: hahaha

In an email answer to that query the author, JP, states:

haha. I tried to lightly hint at it... I used slackware for years, than I got an AMD64 chip and wanted to use it. The only good native 64bit distros that I hadn't tried had been gentoo and ubuntu, so I tried gentoo for a while... and you can guess what I saw there. I'm still using Ubuntu but I am planning on getting back to slackware sometime soon. I'd hate not using a native 64 bit OS on a 64 bit proc, but hey... She's my lady.

So, there ya have it. Big Grin

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Re: Here at Tuxmachines

atang1 wrote:

It seems Tuxmachines prefer PcLos as a stable Linux OS? RH RPM and Mandrake based.

And Linspire 5.0 was not mentioned? Debian sarge based.

Well, I prefer Gentoo for myself, but yes, I tend to recommend PCLOS to most folks as it is stable, complete, and highly supported with a great community. Linspire charges for their additional software and it's not quite as pretty. I just don't like it as well.

atang1 wrote:

SimplyMepis could be a candidate with their multiple versions of Debian? KDE 3.4.3 and Gnome 6.0? Debian etch based.

Sure, sure it could be a candidate. It's a nice enough OS, but still not in the same league as PCLOS. Most of the time I hang on to the qualifier, it depends on your personal tastes.[/quote]

atang1 wrote:

Others may have to improve to be useable? Mostly slackware based.

Oh yeah, I love Slack! and I like the derivatives that spring from it. But it's still not as newbie friendly or someone who just wants to "load and go". For "out of the box" usability or "just works," I recommend PCLOS.

So, who's his lady, again?!

I missed the point, given the phrasing. Is Slackware or Gentoo his lady?! Can't he be more explicit, dammit...

Too much promiscuity. It can be much clearer.
1. Have a wife and stick with her! It's SuSE for me, but I told her to paint her hair only in read, so she's GNOME now.
2. Afford a mistress you can change at most once or twice a year. To me, it was Ubuntu, then PCLOS, now FC5. (It also was Slackware, an ex-wife. I wanted to see what changed with her -- not much, actually. Still a little frigid at the beginning.)
3. Now and then, have a quickie with young and exotic girls! Live distros are the best here. If not, install on real partitions, not in vmware, if you want an adventure to last more than one night and to give *real* sensations (no condom if the distro was tested to be AIDS-negative).
Having a stable wife can be hard at times (even a stable mistress can be boring!), giving that hot chicks are easy and free in the Linux world!

re: So, who's his lady, again?!

I think he was saying Slackware is his lady, but they took a little break and he's been seeing Ubuntu regularly after dating around a while. But he's wanting to go home to Slackware and knows he will soon.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Re: Low down on Linspire 5.0 ?

atang1 wrote:

Tuxmachines is on all three major search machines. Now, we have to cover all the popular Linux distros to offer the low down of each distro to get higher attention in the Linux community. Low down is the deep penetration into the jobs these distro can do for you?

I elect you in charge of that department. Big Grin

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