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Linus Torvalds Talks Linux Development at LinuxCon

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Linux

Linus Torvalds, who created the open-source Linux operating system 22 years ago, took the keynote stage at the LinuxCon conference along with fellow kernel developers to talk about the state of Linux kernel development.

Throughout the hourlong session Sept. 18, the panel was peppered with a barrage of questions on a wide variety of topics, with the outspoken Torvalds providing all manner of colorful comments.

One of the first questions that Torvalds was asked was about how easy or hard it is to actually get involved with Linux kernel development.

"We have an amazing amount of developers, and in some respects it is hard to get involved," Torvalds said. "In other respects, of all the open-source projects that are out there, it is easier to get involved in Linux because there is so much to do."

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